Healthy Memorial Day Weekend Recipe: Layered Chicken Taco Salad

By | Casey Coffey, Exercise & Nutrition | No Comments

Looking for a healthy dish to take to your Memorial Day cookout? Look no further than Casey’s Layered Chicken Taco Salad!

Recipe provided by Casey Coffey MS, RD, LDN Registered Dietician for Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville.

Layered Chicken Taco Salad

Prep time:  20 minutes       Total time:  20 minutes

Serves:  8-10 people

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups chopped romaine lettuce
  • 1 cup riced cauliflower
  • 1 (15 ounce) can black, drained and rinsed
  • 1 (11 ounce) can Mexican corn, drained
  • 1 large avocado, diced
  • 1 ½ cups prepared pico de gallo (or diced tomato)
  • 1 rotisserie chicken, shredded (about 4 cups shredded meat) – can use canned chicken if preferred
  • 1 ½ cups shredded Monterey jack and cheddar chceese
  • 1 (14 ounce) bottle cilantro avocado yogurt dressing (about 1.75 cups dressing) (Bolthouse brand is good) – could also use ranch dressing of choice and add ¼ cup chopped cilantro
  • 1 (3.5 ounce) package tortilla strips (about 1 ½ cups) – tri-color is a great option for Memorial Day

Instructions:

  1. Layer half of each ingredient into a large salad bowl in the order listed above. Repeat layers with remaining half of the ingredients.
  2. Serve immediately or cover with plastic and store in the refrigerator until ready to serve. Leftovers can be stored in refrigerator for 2-3 days.
Nurses Week 2018

Nurses Week 2018

By | Clinical Care, Culture of Care, Dowell Springs, Proton Therapy, Provision CARES, Tennessee, Uncategorized | No Comments

Content and information provided by Lindsay Chandler, RN, BSN, OCN Nursing Manager for Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville

May 6-12 is a week of excellence for every nurse, and marks a time to acknowledge accomplishments, compassionate patient care and professionalism for the nursing society. The conclusion of Nurses Week is May 12th, in honor of the mother of nursing, Florence Nightingale. Florence Nightingale was born on May 12th, 1820, and she was the innovator of modern nursing. It was through her teaching, compassion, leadership and influence, that the world of nursing has evolved into what it is today.

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Tennessee Cancer Patients Denied Coverage for Proton Therapy by Governor’s Veto

By | Legislation, News, Patient Rights, Proton Therapy, Provision CARES, Tennessee Cancer Patient Coalition, Uncategorized | No Comments

Post provided by Tennessee Cancer Patient Coalition Official Press Release

May 4, 2018 8:51am

KNOXVILLE, Tenn.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Tennessee State Governor, Bill Haslam, has vetoed the “Proton Therapy Access Act”, preventing it from becoming law and making it only the fifth bill he has vetoed in his tenure as Tennessee Governor.

“The Governor’s letter misrepresents the language of SB0367/HB0523, by inaccurately stating that cancer patients may be at risk for paying more for proton therapy,” states Don Denton, president of Tennessee Cancer Patient Coalition. “In actuality, there is no fiscal impact to the State or to the individual state health plan members.” Read More

Esophageal Cancer Awareness Month

Proton Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

By | Cancer, Dr. Allen Meek, Esophageal Cancer, Knoxville, Rebecca Bergeron | No Comments

Content and information provided by Rebecca Bergeron, RN, BSN, OCN Director of Clinical Services for Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville

Spring is here, and as flowers and trees bring forth new life and color, we are reminded that positive change is possible. Likewise, innovative therapies that have emerged over the years are offering hope to not only have a stronger fight against cancer, but to reduce treatment-related problems during and after the fight. April is Esophageal Cancer Awareness Month and proton therapy is our spring season in cancer treatment. Read More

Maintaining a Healthy Nutritional Status When Diagnosed with Head & Neck Cancers

By | Cancer, Casey Coffey, Head and neck cancer, side effects, Uncategorized | No Comments

Content and information provided by Casey Coffey MS, RD, LDN Registered Dietician for Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville

As we raise awareness of head & neck cancers during the month of April, it is important to be aware of the unique challenges that are at risk when diagnosed with head and neck cancer. Studies for patients who choose proton therapy treatment for head and neck cancers have shown less side effects during first 3 months after treatment and quicker return to normal function. The potential side effects for head and neck cancer patients make swallowing food and fluids difficult and sometimes painful. Malnutrition affects an estimated 40 – 80% of cancer patients – particularly those with gastrointestinal or head and neck cancers.

The four main nutritional goals for cancer patients include:

  • Strive to maintain a healthy weight
  • Consume foods and beverages for managing cancer and treatment-related side effects
  • Select and eat healthy foods that supply the body with fuel and nutrients for repair and healing
  • Reduce risk of cancer recurrence and the development of a second malignancy

Many patients do not realize the importance of nutrition while under treatment. Primary goals of nutrition therapy are to prevent or reverse nutrient deficiencies, preserve lean body mass, support the immune system, and minimize and manage the impact of nutrition related symptoms and side effects to maximize quality of life. Adequate nutrition is more than just maintaining body weight. The foods we eat contain nutrients necessary to support healing and restoration but also to support our healthy cells as well. Adequate nutrition has been shown to improve outcomes in cancer patients, improve strength and energy, avoid dose reduction or treatment breaks.

Make Every Bite Count.

Initially, it is recommended patients eat what they can tolerate while focusing on protein with each meal and including whole foods (minimizing the processed nature of foods). Why? Well, quality counts. High quality foods, which are those that are less processed, are more nutritious due to their higher nutritional value. As treatment progresses and possible side effects begin, the ability to swallow can become difficult. If difficulty to swallow becomes a problem for head and neck cancers, here are three ideas on how to maintain nutritional value through your diet:

  • Graze throughout the day on nutrient dense foods: Nutrient dense foods that have been fortified with protein and additional calories without adding volume and lots of sugar or highly processed foods. Some examples are olive oil, butter, coconut oil, coconut butter, peanut butter, heavy cream, half & half, or any nut butter.
  • Alter texture of foods to improve tolerance: focus on soft or smooth foods such as, bananas, watermelon, canned fruits, peach, pear, and apricot nectars, pureed or mashed vegetables, oatmeal, cooked cereal, cottage cheese, yogurt, milkshakes, custards, puddings, gelatin, macaroni and cheese, scrambled eggs, and ground meats.
  • Avoid irritating foods, such as, citrus fruits or juices, spicy or salty foods, pickled or vinegary foods, tomato-based foods (salsa, spaghetti sauce, and pizza), rough or dry foods, hot spices (pepper, chili powder, nutmeg, cloves, and curry).

For more information about how to overcome nutritional challenges when diagnosed with head & neck cancers or to learn about proton therapy, contact our CARE Team at 865-229-4689.

 

04-12-18_VolunteerAppreciation

Volunteer Appreciation in the “Volunteer State”

By | Culture of Care, Dowell Springs, East Tennessee, Knoxville, Patient Hospitality, Tennessee, Uncategorized | No Comments

This week, April 15-21, Provision will celebrate Volunteer Appreciation Week by honoring our very own Proton Volunteer, Mrs. Sue. Sue and her husband retired to Knoxville from Washington, DC in 2001. She has been a volunteer for Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville since 2016 and has been filling the proton center with extra joy and smiles ever since. Read More

NAPT Blog

Provision CARE Proton Therapy Attends the 2018 NAPT Conference

By | Proton Therapy, Uncategorized | No Comments

Content and information provided by Talbott Paynter, Director of Business Development for Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville

The National Association for Proton Therapy (NAPT) held its sixth annual NAPT Conference March 25-28, 2018, at The Scottsdale Resort at McCormick Ranch in sunny Scottdale, Arizona. Founded in 1990, the National Association for Proton Therapy is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to work collaboratively to:

  1. Raise awareness of the therapeutic benefits of proton therapy among patients, providers, payers, policymakers, and other stakeholders
  2. Ensure patient choice and access to affordable proton therapy
  3. Encourage cooperative research and innovation to advance the appropriate and cost-effective utilization of proton therapy.

The annual conference allows proton centers from across the Unites States to convene and discuss how to advance awareness of the clinical benefits of proton therapy for cancer patients, provide education, and advocate for insurance coverage. Read More

03-22-CauliflowerStirFry

Fighting Cancer with Your Fork Recipe of the Month: Cauliflower Rice with Vegetable Stir-Fry

By | Casey Coffey, Exercise & Nutrition | No Comments

Content and information provided by Casey Coffey MS, RD, LDN Registered Dietician for Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville

Yield:  4 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 package riced cauliflower (you can find this at Trader Joe’s or Kroger in the produce section)
  • 2 carrots, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, thinly sliced
  • 1 medium red bell pepper, cored, seeded and chopped
  • 1 vidalia onion, chopped or thinly sliced
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 cups snow peas, trimmed
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt, divided
  • 2 Tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 Tablespoon soy sauce (or Bragg liquid aminos)

Instructions:

  1. Heat olive oil in pan and sauté carrots, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 1 minute.
  2. Add bell pepper and onion, ¼ teaspoon salt, and garlic; cook, stirring frequently, about 2 minutes.
  3. Add peas, sprinkle with remaining ¼ teaspoon salt and pepper and cook, stirring frequently, 1 minute.
  4. Place cooked vegetables in bowl and set aside while preparing cauliflower.
  5. Return skillet to head; add sesame oil, cauliflower and beaten eggs.
  6. Cook, stirring constantly, until eggs are evenly cooked and cauliflower has softened, about 2-4 minutes.
  7. Add cooked vegetables and soy sauce to cauliflower / egg mixture; cook 1 minute more or until warm through.
  8. Divide stir-fry among 4 bowls.
  9. Enjoy!!

Note: Stir fry chicken, shrimp or tofu with above to complete your meal.

Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

Colorectal Cancer: The Importance of Early Detection and Understanding Screening Options

By | Cancer, colon cancer, Prevention, Provision CARES, Rectal Cancer, Screening, Uncategorized | No Comments

Content and information provided by Rebecca Bergeron, RN, BSN, OCN Director of Clinical Services for Provision CARES Proton Therapy Knoxville

This week, we’re going to talk about number two- the second leading cause of cancer death, that is. Colorectal cancer is highly preventable through early detection, yet many people remain unaware of their options for screening. Screening is especially important for preventing colorectal cancer because the disease usually does not have noticeable symptoms until it is advanced. Read More

What is Lymphedema

Lymphedema Awareness Month

By | Cancer, lymphedema, physical therapy | No Comments

What is Lymphedema? And What Does it Mean for my Cancer Diagnosis

Content and information provided by Kathy Kearse, PT, CLT-LANA

To understand Lymphedema and to honor lymphedema awareness month, let’s talk first about the Lymphatic System.  Most people have heard of the Circulatory System, which consists of the heart, arteries, and veins. The lesser known Lymphatic System is a one-way system of vessels, which runs parallel to the blood vessels, starting in the tissue spaces throughout the body (skin, muscle, organs, etc.) and ending at large veins close to the heart.  Read More